THE FILM ATLAS

Issue 2: Boundaries

Issue 2 of The Film Atlas focuses on boundaries—on and off screen. Here we explore boundaries of the body, of personal experience, of human empathy, and of the cinematic image itself. Click any of the film stills below to join us on our journey to explore visual culture.

 
 
“Thus, as with puberty, the mother explores a new relation to the self, and to her own identity, as her body and its cycles change with pregnancy and infant caregiving, and re-open these explorations once more with each new child. Hence a scene where Marlo, a groggy alien not only in her own home but in her own skin, sits slumped at the kitchen table, vein-ravaged belly out. Her daughter comments cutely, astutely: ‘Mommy, what’s wrong with your body?’”  — Rebecca Alter

“Thus, as with puberty, the mother explores a new relation to the self, and to her own identity, as her body and its cycles change with pregnancy and infant caregiving, and re-open these explorations once more with each new child. Hence a scene where Marlo, a groggy alien not only in her own home but in her own skin, sits slumped at the kitchen table, vein-ravaged belly out. Her daughter comments cutely, astutely: ‘Mommy, what’s wrong with your body?’”
— Rebecca Alter

“The likelihood of a physically abusive man appearing as the romantic hero has (thankfully) decreased with time, but the more subtle manipulative behaviour demonstrated by many of romance’s favourite leading men of recent decades is equally troubling.”  — Natalie Moore

“The likelihood of a physically abusive man appearing as the romantic hero has (thankfully) decreased with time, but the more subtle manipulative behaviour demonstrated by many of romance’s favourite leading men of recent decades is equally troubling.”
— Natalie Moore


“When Carol’s perm is revealed to her at the end of the scene, she is granted only a few seconds of timid appreciation before her nostril pools with vivid dark blood […] The myth of female perfection, dreamily constructed in the beauty salon, is ruptured by the violence of Carol’s nosebleed.” — Sophia Larigakis

“When Carol’s perm is revealed to her at the end of the scene, she is granted only a few seconds of timid appreciation before her nostril pools with vivid dark blood […] The myth of female perfection, dreamily constructed in the beauty salon, is ruptured by the violence of Carol’s nosebleed.”
— Sophia Larigakis

Bloodshed in Suburbia

By Sophia Larigakis

“Ari Folman’s  Waltz with Bashir  is an autobiographical documentary that chronicles the director’s efforts to uncover repressed memories of his military deployment in the 1982 Lebanon War.  Waltz’s  animated form literally illustrates this recollective odyssey, as Folman confronts details of the massacre of Palestinian refugees at the Sabra and Shatila camps, which occurred near his military post.” — Genevieve Citron

“Ari Folman’s Waltz with Bashir is an autobiographical documentary that chronicles the director’s efforts to uncover repressed memories of his military deployment in the 1982 Lebanon War. Waltz’s animated form literally illustrates this recollective odyssey, as Folman confronts details of the massacre of Palestinian refugees at the Sabra and Shatila camps, which occurred near his military post.”
— Genevieve Citron


“Ramsey’s depictions are inconsistent with the typical action flick’s tendency to celebrate violence. When Superman suckerpunches a villain or James Bond fires his gun, violence is heroic, used to promote the greater good. Conversely  You Were Never Really Here  refuses to glorify aggression on-screen.” — Katie Elder

“Ramsey’s depictions are inconsistent with the typical action flick’s tendency to celebrate violence. When Superman suckerpunches a villain or James Bond fires his gun, violence is heroic, used to promote the greater good. Conversely You Were Never Really Here refuses to glorify aggression on-screen.”
— Katie Elder

“Further, for its relentless use of Catholic iconography in a historically Jewish home, the house itself serves as an allegory for the cleansing of minority groups that overwhelmed Poland during the war, as well as the country’s subsequent homogeneous demographic.”  — Taryn Fleischmann

“Further, for its relentless use of Catholic iconography in a historically Jewish home, the house itself serves as an allegory for the cleansing of minority groups that overwhelmed Poland during the war, as well as the country’s subsequent homogeneous demographic.”
— Taryn Fleischmann

By Taryn Fleischmann

By Katie Elder


“I would call phenomena such as these classic cases of bystander apathy. Is the world actually a better place? Or are we just tricking people into thinking the world is a better place?” — Sam Doll

“I would call phenomena such as these classic cases of bystander apathy. Is the world actually a better place? Or are we just tricking people into thinking the world is a better place?”
— Sam Doll

“People should be careful about what they say and how they act. Artistic temperament was always just an excuse for bad behaviour. If someone is being an asshole, they probably are an asshole.” — Jeff Melvin

“People should be careful about what they say and how they act. Artistic temperament was always just an excuse for bad behaviour. If someone is being an asshole, they probably are an asshole.”
— Jeff Melvin


“Fight for and push for the most distinct, strong, voices that we have here. And strong doesn’t mean loudest, it means people who are showing us our world in the most distinct and powerful way. — Kevan Funk

“Fight for and push for the most distinct, strong, voices that we have here. And strong doesn’t mean loudest, it means people who are showing us our world in the most distinct and powerful way.
— Kevan Funk

Our idea with the second issue of The Film Atlas was to encourage discussion around barriers, be them positive or negative, both on and off screen. Accordingly,  Issue 2: Boundaries , speaks to the encounter of limits and film.

Our idea with the second issue of The Film Atlas was to encourage discussion around barriers, be them positive or negative, both on and off screen. Accordingly, Issue 2: Boundaries, speaks to the encounter of limits and film.

Editor’s Note

By Genevieve Citron


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